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Computer analysis of protein sequences

  • M. O. Dayhoff
Part of the FASEB Monographs book series (FASEBM, volume 2)

Abstract

Most interesting of all of the biochemical components of living organisms are proteins and nucleic acids because of their potential for diversity in structure and function and their key positions in the evolutionary feedback system of each species. Sequence studies on these molecules have been carried out for various purposes in a number of disciplines: structural chemistry, crystallography, enzymology, genetics, evolution, systematics, physiology, immunology, pharmacology, genetic diseases, toxicology, virology, bacteriology, and even anthropology. In many of these disciplines, the protein and nucleic acid sequences and associated data are essential for a correct exposition of the fundamental concepts and for a parsimonious organization of the knowledge. A new field of study termed molecular evolution has emerged consisting of chemical, genetic, biological, and mathematical intercorrelations of such data. I will first describe the data available and then touch on some of the uses we make of the computer in research using this data.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Tree Size Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor Odds Matrix Mutation Acceptance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. O. Dayhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.National Biomedical Research FoundationGeorgetown University Medical CenterUSA

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