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Measurement of the Flow of Liquefied Gases with Sharp-Edged Orifices

  • R. J. Richards
  • R. B. Jacobs
  • W. J. Pestalozzi
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 4)

Abstract

The great increase in the use of liquefied gases by both government and industry has stimulated the very rapid growth of cryogenic engineering. As a result many engineers with no low temperature experience have suddenly been concerned with problems at very low temperature. There has been a tendency to assume that liquefied gases will not obey the physical principles governing the behavior of the more familiar fluids. This assumption is not tenable; as a matter of fact, there are good reasons why the behavior of liquefied gases is more readily predictable than more common liquids, such as water and petroleum products.

Keywords

Reynolds Number Diameter Ratio Discharge Coefficient Liquid Hydrogen Solid Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    K. B. Martin, R. B. Jacobs, and R. J. Hardy, Proceedings of the 1956 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, p. 295, Boulder. Colorado. Sept. 1956.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. C. Binder, Fluid Mechanics, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 3rd Ed. New York (1955).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    G. L. Tuve, and R. E. Sprenkle, Instruments, 6, 201, Nov. 1933.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. W. Benjamin, and J. G. Miller, Trans. A.S.M.E. , 63, 419, (1941).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Richards
    • 1
  • R. B. Jacobs
    • 1
  • W. J. Pestalozzi
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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