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Cryogenic Engineering Advances in the Space Age

  • R. F. Blanks
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 5)

Abstract

Rocket and missile technology, design and construction has become increasingly important since the end of the Second World War. Today the prestige, defense, or even survival of a nation may depend upon its rocket and missile research and development program. Satellites of Russian and United States origin are circling the earth and moon, relaying valuable information to their designers. The starting gun has sounded for the race to the stars. Cryogenic engineering operations and techniques play an important part in winning this race.

Keywords

Storage Tank Liquid Hydrogen Specific Impulse Rocket Propellant Heat Leak 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. F. Blanks
    • 1
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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