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The Design and Testing of a 6000 GPM Liquid Oxygen Pump Transfer System

  • L. R. Smith
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 6)

Abstract

The need for transferring liquid oxygen and fuel at very high flow rates resulted from a need to minimize the operational countdown time for firing an intercontinental ballistic missile. During the period when the equipment for operational missile sites was being planned, a survey was conducted to determine the best method for transferring liquid oxygen. and fuel at the flow rates required. Emphasis was placed on the availability of off-the-shelf items and, although high capacity fuel pumps were available, no liquid oxygen pumps of the capacities required had been built at that time, Therefore, it was deemed expedient to choose a system using gas pressure to accomplish the loading. Pressure transfer had the further advantage of low power requirement during periods of maximum drain on the base power supply [1].

Keywords

Pump System Liquid Oxygen Ballistic Missile Vent Valve Rapid Load 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    D.C. Bowersock, R. W. Gardner and R. C. Reid, “Pressurized Transfer of Cryogenic Liquids,” Advances in Cryogenic Engineering. Vol. 4. K.D. Timmerhaus. (ed.), Plenum Press, Inc.. New York (1960).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W.G. Flieder, W.J. Smith and K.R. Wetmore, “Flexibility Considerations for the Design of Cryogenic Transfer Lines.” Advances in Cryogenic Engineering. Vol. 5. K.D. Timmerhaus. (ed.), Plenum Press, Inc.. New York (1960).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. R. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.The J. C. Carter CompanyCosta MesaUSA

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