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Selection of Lubricants and Thread Compounds for Oxygen Missile Systems

  • C. H. Reynales
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 6)

Abstract

The missile industry has been concerned from the beginning about the presence of lubricants in oxygen systems because the use of some of these compounds may lead to burnouts and to disastrous explosions. Although lubrication of oxygen equipment is discouraged by the oxygen industry, as well as by the missile designers, it is essential in the operation of some types of equipment such as compressors, pumps and valves. Furthermore, in the pipefitting and plumbing trades, it is a standard and necessary practice to lubricate the joints and threads of pipe, tubing and related fittings to reduce friction and seizing and to assure a tight connection, In the installation of the complex propellant systems of liquid oxygen-kerosene—powered missiles, these compounds have assumed extraordinary importance because most of them are easily oxidized and thus their use can constitute a potential hazard, This brief study aims to analyze the reasons behind the special role played by these compounds in missile oxygen systems and to find means of reducing the hazards resulting from their usage by evolving criteria for selecting safe compounds.

Keywords

Molybdenum Disulfide Rocket Engine Oxygen System Reaction Motor Impact Sensitivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Reynales
    • 1
  1. 1.Space Technology LaboratoriesLos AngelesUSA

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