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The Correlation of Thermodynamic Properties of Cryogenic Fluids

  • R. B. Stewart
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 9)

Abstract

The need for more extensive tabulations of thermodynamic property data for the cryogenic fluids and for tabular values where previously only graphical data were available was recognized several years ago for use in the work being carried out in this laboratory. As a consequence, a program was undertaken in the Cryogenic Processes Section which has resulted in the publication of tables of properties for helium, normal hydrogen, and nitrogen, This compilation of thermodynamic data from the literature has been continued in the Cryogenic Data Center and new publications with tabular values are now available for oxygen, argon, neon, and carbon monoxide. These publications indicate the experimental data considered, the compilation methods used, and the estimated accuracy of these tabulations.

Keywords

Georgia Institute Virial Equation Property Table Liquid Data Cryogenic Fluid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Stewart
    • 1
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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