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Functions for the Calculation of Entropy, Enthalpy, and Internal Energy for Real Fluids Using Equations of State and Specific Heats

  • J. G. Hust
  • A. L. Gosman
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 9)

Abstract

Several recent publications [1–5] from this laboratory on the calculation of thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids contain various relations for the determination of entropy, enthalpy, and internal energy. Considerable interest has been expressed about the derivation and application of these equations; this interest generally results from the fact that standard texts on thermodynamics are, almost without exception, inadequate in the presentation of material on the calculation of thermodynamic properties. The purpose of this paper is to derive the functions necessary for the calculation of these properties. These derivations are intended to give the reader a better understanding of the methods of calculating thermodynamic properties and thus of the limitations of the tables so produced.

Keywords

Thermodynamic Property Internal Energy Specific Heat Capacity Real Fluid Referenee State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    T. R. Strobridge, “The Thermodynamic Properties of Nitrogen from 64 to 300°K between 0.1 and 200 Atmospheres,” NBS Tech. Note No. 129 (Jan. 1962).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D. B. Mann, “The Thermodynamic Properties of Helium from 3 to 300°K between 0.5 and 100 Atmospheres,” NBS Tech. Note No. 154 (Jan. 1962).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. M. Roder and R. D. Goodwin, “Provisiona! Thermodynamic Functions for Para-hydrogen,” NBS Tech. Note No. 130 (Dec. 1961).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. G. Hust and R. B. Stewart, “Thermodynamic Property Values for Gaseous and Liquid Carbon Monoxide from 70 to 300°K with Pressures to 300 Atmospheres,” NBS Tech. Note No. 202 (1963).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. D. McCarty, and R. B. Stewart, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 9, Plenum Press, New York, this volume, p. 161.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. G. Hust
    • 1
  • A. L. Gosman
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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