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Effect of Adsorbed Nitrogen on Catalytic Activity of Ortho-Parahydrogen Conversion Catalysts

  • C. McKinley
  • G. Schmauch
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 9)

Abstract

Knowledge of the influence of adsorbed impurities upon catalyst effectiveness is of theoretical and practical interest. The ortho-parahydrogen conversion mechanism in heterogeneous catalysis involves the adsorption of hydrogen. Any adsorbate which competes with hydrogen may be expected to reduce the catalyst effectiveness unless this competing adsorbate is also a catalyst. The extent and character of the reduction due to adsorption of an impurity may illuminate the catalyst behavior. Understanding of the effect of an impurity upon catalyst performance permits operating limitations to be placed upon the concentration of impurities in the feed stream to a liquefaction plant [1].

Keywords

Pure Hydrogen Normal Boiling Point Cryogenic Engineer Catalyst Area Liquefaction Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. McKinley
    • 1
  • G. Schmauch
    • 1
  1. 1.Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.AllentownUSA

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