Advertisement

Performance of a New Cryogenic Aluminum Alloy, 7039

  • F. W. DeMoney
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 9)

Abstract

Several years ago, the aluminum industry Introduced the high-strength, weldable aluminum-magnesium alloys, particularly alloy 5083, to the engineering industry for use as pressure-vessel and cryogenic-tankage material. Since then, this organization has been directing its research efforts toward the development of a high-strength, heat-treatable, yet weldable, aluminum alloy which would permit greater maximum allowable stresses than are now approved for 5083 alloy under the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code [1]. Prior investigations, reported previously, have described the mechanical properties of alloy 5083 at cryogenic temperatures to -452°F [2–4].

Keywords

Tensile Strength Tensile Property Filler Alloy Round Specimen Cryogenic Engineer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, “Rules for Construction of Unfired Pressure Vessels,” ASME, New York (1962).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. D. Olleman and G. C. Wolfer, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 5, Plenum Press, New York (1960), p. 430.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    F. W. DeMoney and G. C. Wolfer, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 6, Plenum Press, New York (1961), p. 590.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    L. P. Rice, J. E. Campbell, and W. F. Simmons, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 8, Plenum Press, New York (1963), p. 671.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    The Aluminum Association, Standards for Wrought Aluminum Mill Products, Fifth ed., (October 1962).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    H. Neuber, Theory of Notch Stresses (English translation by J. W. Edwards), Ann Arbor, Michigan (1958).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. L. Christian, “Physical and Mechanical Properties of Pressure Vessel Materials for Application in a Cryogenic Environment,” ASD-TDR-62–258 (March, 1962).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. R. Lucas, NASA, Huntsville, Ala., private communication (November 19, 1962).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    J. L. Christian, “Physical and Mechanical Properties of Pressure Vessel Materials for Application in a Cryogenic Environment, Part II,” ASD-TDR-62–258 (April 1963).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    L. P. Rice, J. E. Campbell, and W. F. Simmons, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 7, Plenum, Press, New York (1962), p. 478.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. G. Kaufman, F. G. Nelson, and E. W. Johnson, in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 8, Plenum Press, New York (1963), p. 661.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. DeMoney
    • 1
  1. 1.Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical CorporationSpokaneUSA

Personalised recommendations