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Neon-Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

  • R. C. Albert
  • C. L. Goodzeit
  • F. C. Pechar
  • A. G. Prodell
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 11)

Abstract

Some of the recent significant advances in high-energy physics have been made using bubble chambers in conjunction with high-energy accelerators. Two basically different types of bubble chambers are presently used. There are the light liquid chambers which operate cryogenically with liquid hydrogen and deuterium as the detecting medium for charged particles. There are also heavy liquid chambers which are usually filled with propane, Freon, or liquid mixtures and operate near room temperature, Heavy liquid chambers are more efficient than hydrogen chambers for observing gamma-ray conversions and neutrino interactions which would normally go undetected in liquid hydrogen because of its long radiation length (approximately 990 cm) and low density.

Keywords

Liquid Mixture Pure Hydrogen Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chamber Liquid Phase Separation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    M. Goldhaber, private communication (1964).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. В. Streett and С. H. Jones, J. Chem. Phys. 42:3989 (June 1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    R.I. Louttit, “Performance of BNL 20-inch Hydrogen Bubble Chamber,” paper IIb-7, Instrumentation Conference for High Energy Physics, Berkeley (September 1960).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Amiot, Nucl. Instr. 3:275 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Albert
    • 1
  • C. L. Goodzeit
    • 1
  • F. C. Pechar
    • 1
  • A. G. Prodell
    • 1
  1. 1.Brookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA

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