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Physical Properties of Filament Wound Glass Epoxy Structures as Applied to Possible Use in Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

  • H. Brechna
  • W. Haldemann
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 11)

Abstract

The bubble chamber has established Itself in high-energy physics research as one of the most useful tools. Since 1952, after the first bubble chamber was Introduced by Glaser[1], hundreds of important experiments have been carried on successfully. With the increase of the energy of modem accelerators the need for better and larger bubble chambers has grown. Recent proposals to match the size and magnetic field to the particle energy [2] show an increase in the bubble chamber size up to 3.93 m (14 ft). However, the magnetic field chosen was 20 kG, partly to save DC power, which for the above proposal is about 11 MW.

Keywords

Shear Strength Pulse Magnet Liquid Hydrogen Filament Structure Bubble Chamber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Brechna
    • 1
  • W. Haldemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterStanfordUSA

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