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A Superconducting Liquid-Level Sensor for Slush Hydrogen Use

  • B. L. Knight
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
  • T. M. Flynn
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 11)

Abstract

The fact that solid-liquid mixtures of hydrogen, commonly known as slush hydrogen, are being considered for use as rocket propellants has stimulated interest in the development of liquid-level sensors for systems of this type. Slush exists at the triple point temperature of hydrogen, and since this temperature is below the transition temperature of several superconducting compounds, it should be possible to construct a superconducting liquid-level sensor (point or continuous) for use in slush hydrogen.

Keywords

Liquid Level Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Propellant Sensor Resistance Space Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    R. B. Scott, Cryogenic Engineering, D. Van Nostrand Company, Princeton, New Jersey (1959), p. 338.Google Scholar
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    B. W. Roberts, General Electric Research Laboratory Report, No. 63-RL-3252M, Schenectady, New York (March 1963), p. 92.Google Scholar
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    J. R. Feldmeier and B. Serin, Rev. Sci. Instr. 19:916 (1948).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    B. F. Figgins, T. A. Shepherd, and J. W. Snowman, J. Sci. Instr. 41:520 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    V. J. Johnson and R. B. Stewart, A Compendium of the Properties of Materials at Low Temperatures, Phase II, National Bureau of Standards, Cryogenic Engineering Laboratories, Boulder, Colorado (December 1961), p. 225.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. L. Knight
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. M. Flynn
    • 1
  1. 1.Cryogenics DivisionNBS Institute for Materials ResearchBoulderUSA
  2. 2.University of ColoradoUSA

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