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Liquid-Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Near the Triple Point

  • D. B. Mann
  • P. R. Ludtke
  • C. F. Sindt
  • D. B. Chelton
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 11)

Abstract

Space vehicle fueling using liquid hydrogen and a suitable oxidizer is, at the present time, an accomplished fact. Such vehicles as the Saturn and Centaur incorporate highly sophisticated systems for the combination of hydrogen and oxygen in order to realize the potential high specific thrust of this fuel. The production, storage, and transport of the liquid hydrogen fuel are also highly developed and are no longer considered a major problem.

Keywords

Terminal Velocity Liquid Hydrogen Solid Hydrogen Pipeline Transport Pretreatment Chamber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    R. R. Carney, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 9, Plenum Press, New York (1964), p. 529.Google Scholar
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    C. W. Elrodj Aero-Propulsion Lab., Research and Technology Division, Air Force Systems Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, private communication.Google Scholar
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    R. F. Dwyer and G. A. Cook, “Research on Rheologic and Thermodynamic Properties of Solid and Slush Hydrogen,” Final Report on Air Force Contract AP33(657)-11098, Union Carbide Corp., Linde Division, Tonawanda, New York (1965).Google Scholar
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    L. R. Niendorf and O. J. Noichl, “Research of Production Techniques for Obtaining over 50% Solid in Slush Hydrogen,” Technical Report AFAPL-TR-64–151, Air Force Contract AF33(615)-1357, Linde Division, Union Carbide Corp. (February 1965).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. B. Mann
    • 1
  • P. R. Ludtke
    • 1
  • C. F. Sindt
    • 1
  • D. B. Chelton
    • 1
  1. 1.Cryogenics DivisionNBS Institute for Material ResearchBoulderUSA

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