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Design of a Closed-Cycle Helium Temperature Refrigerator

  • C. E. Witter
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 11)

Abstract

The advantages of having operating environments in the temperature region below 5°K for low noise levels in masers and other amplifiers for radio telescopes, communications satellites, military radar, superconducting computers, and other electronic equipment are now generally recognized. Because of the duty cycle and location of most of these applications, the need for a simple, highly reliable, closed-cycle refrigerator clearly exists.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Engine Speed Union Carbide Corporation Cryogenic Engineer Vacuum Jacket 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. Witter
    • 1
  1. 1.Linde DivisionUnion Carbide CorporationTonawandaUSA

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