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Heat-Exchanger Design for Rocket-Borne Cryogenic Air Samplers

  • R. B. Jacobs
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 15)

Abstract

The acquisition of samples of the earth’s atmosphere has been important to scientists for many years. However, the techniques which have been available for this have had serious limitations. When a sampler is carried by an airplane or balloon, the sampling altitudes are limited, the sample can be contaminated, and the various constituents of the atmosphere may be preferentially collected. Past samplers which have been carried by rockets have been unable to collect large masses of atmosphere from high altitudes, some have contaminated the sample, and some have collected preferentially. The purpose of this paper is to discuss one of the design problems encountered in the development of a rocket-borne device that has collected large, whole, and uncontaminated samples of the atmosphere at high altitudes.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Launch Vehicle Shell Diameter Tube Spacing Altitude Interval 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Jacobs
    • 1
  1. 1.Robert B. Jacobs Associates, Inc.BoulderUSA

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