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Construction of the 12-Foot Bubble Chamber Superconducting-Magnet Cryostat

  • R. E. Jones
  • K. B. Martin
  • J. R. Purcell
  • G. E. McIntosh
  • J. N. McLagan
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 15)

Abstract

Many small-bore superconducting magnets have been designed and constructed in the last few years. The successful operation of these magnets and the accumulated knowledge in the “state of the art” prompted consideration of the use of a superconducting magnet for the 12-ft ANL bubble chamber. A conventional magnet, with water-cooled coils, and the superconducting magnet were designed concurrently. It became apparent that the capital cost to construct each magnet would be about the same. The operation of the superconducting magnet on a 24 hr a day basis, annually, would save 10 MW of power or approximately $400,000.

Keywords

Liquid Helium Vacuum Vessel Bubble Chamber Ring Plate Vacuum Jacket 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    P. C. Vander Arend, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 15, Plenum Press, New York (1970), p. 150.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Jones
    • 1
  • K. B. Martin
    • 1
  • J. R. Purcell
    • 1
  • G. E. McIntosh
    • 2
  • J. N. McLagan
    • 3
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA
  2. 2.Cryogenic Engineering Co.DenverUSA
  3. 3.Stearns-Roger CorporationDenverUSA

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