Advertisement

Extracellular Potassium Change in the Rat Adenohypophysis: An Indicator of Neurohypophyseal-Adenohypophyseal Communication

  • A. J. Baertschi
  • M. Friedli
  • J. Munoz
  • M. Tsacopoulos
  • J. A. Coles
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

It has been generally thought that hypothalamic releasing and inhibiting factors are secreted from nerve terminals of the median eminence into long portal vessels, and transported in plasma toward the anterior pituitary gland. Scanning electron microscopy of pituitary vascular casts revealed, however, that the median eminence, the posterior lobe, and the anterior lobe were interconnected by portal vessels (Page and Bergland, 1977). Further, numerous compounds with anterior lobe hormone-releasing and -inhibiting activity have been identified in the posterior lobe. Thus, posterior lobe compounds may reach the anterior lobe, as suggested by Porter et al. (1977), and modulate adenohypophyseal hormone secretions; alternatively, adenohypophyseal hormones may reach the posterior lobe (Page and Bergland, 1977).

Keywords

Corticotropin Release Factor Median Eminence Anterior Lobe Posterior Lobe Pituitary Stalk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baertschi, A. J., and Dreifuss, J. J., 1978, Antidromic compound potentials of the pituitary tract: Interactions with systemic bradykinin, Brain Res. 149: 530.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baertschi, A. J., Vallet, P., and Girard, J., 1979, Neurohypophysis modulates corticotropin release in the rat, J. Physiol. (Paris) 75(1): 1B.Google Scholar
  3. Coles, J. A., and Tsacopoulos, M., 1979, K+ activity in photoreceptors, glial cells and extracellular space in the drone retina: Changes during photostimulation, J. Physiol. (London) 290: 525.Google Scholar
  4. Dreifuss, J. J., and Ruf, K. B., 1972, A transpharyngeal approach to the rat hypothalamus, in: Experiments in Physiology and Biochemistry (G. Kerkut, ed.), Vol. 5, pp, 213–228, Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
  5. Page, R. B., and Bergland, R. M., 1977, The neurohypophyseal capillary bed. Part I. Anatomy and arterial supply, Am. J. Anat. 148: 345.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Porter, J. C., Oliver, C., Eskay, R. L., Barnea, A., Parker, C. R., and Ben-Jonathan, N., 1977, Hypothalamic-pituitary interaction, in: The Pituitary: A Current Review (M. B. Allen and V. B. Mahesh, eds.), pp. 215–234, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Saffran, M., and Schally. A. V., 1977, The status of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), Neuroendocrinology 24: 359.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Yasuda, N., Greer, M. A., Greer, S. E., and Panton, P., 1978, Studies on the site of action of vasopressin in inducing adrenocorticotropin secretion, Endocrinology 103: 906.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Yates, F. E., Russel, S. M., Dallman, M. F., Hedge, G. A., McCann, S. M., and Dhariwal, A. P. S., 1971, Potentiation by vasopressin of corticotropin release induced by CRF, Endocrinology 88: 3.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Zimmerman, E. A., Carmel, P. W., Husain, M. K., Ferin, M., Tannenbaum, M., Frantz, A. G., and Robinson, A. G., 1973, Vasopressin and neurophysin: High concentrations in monkey hypophyseal portal blood, Science 182: 925.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Baertschi
    • 1
  • M. Friedli
    • 1
  • J. Munoz
    • 1
  • M. Tsacopoulos
    • 1
  • J. A. Coles
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Animal Biology, Ophthalmology, and PhysiologyUniversity of GenevaGeneva 4Switzerland

Personalised recommendations