Advertisement

Immunochemical Characterization of Syrian Hamster Major Histocompatibility Complex Homologues

  • J. Theodore Phillips
  • J. Wayne Streilein
  • Diane A. Proia
  • William R. Duncan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 134)

Abstract

The genes within the chromosomal segment known as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode products that enable immunologic communication among cells and promote self-versus-nonself recognition—capabilities considered vital to every mammalian species (1). Generalizations of the mechanisms involved in MHC function are derived from studies performed in various animal models (1,2). Historically, the Syrian hamster has been considered unique with regard to certain MHC-mediated phenomena. Abnormal structure and/or expression of hamster MHC products have been suggested to account for certain of these features (3–5). To investigate these alternatives, cell-surface molecules putatively homologous to MHC products of other species have been identified and immunochemically characterized in the Syrian hamster (6–8). The possible relationships between these homologues and newly defined hamster cell-surface alloantigens are considered in this study.

Keywords

Syrian Hamster Antigen Preparation Hamster Cheek Pouch Hamster Strain IMMUNOCHEMICAL Characterization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Götze, D., ed. The Major Histocompatibility System in Man and Animals. Springer-Verlag (1977).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Klein, J. Biology of the Mouse Histocompatibility-2 Complex. Springer-Verlag (1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Duncan, W.R.; Streilein, J.W. Transplantation 25 (1978) 12.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Duncan, W.R.; Streilein, J.W. Transplantation 25 (1978) 17.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Duncan, W.R.; Streilein, J.W. J Immunol 118 (1977) 832.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Phillips, J.T. et al. Immunogenetics 7 (1978) 445.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Phillips, J.T. et al. Immunogenetics 9 (1979) 477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Phillips, J.T. Dissertation, University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas (1979).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Klein, J. et al. Immunogenetics 6 (1978) 489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Klein, J. et al. Transplantation 22 (1976) 572.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wakeland, E.K.; Klein, J. Immunogenetics 8 (1979) 27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    O’Farrell, P.Z. et al. Cell 12 (1977) 1133.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Klein, J. et al. Immunogenetics 2 (1975) 141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Smilek, D.E. et al. J Exp Med 151 (1980) 1139.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Shinohara, N. et al. J Immunol 121 (1978) 637.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Blankenhorn, E.P. et al. Eur J Immunol 10 (1980) 145.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lunney, J.K.; Sachs, D.H. J Immunol 122 (1979) 623.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Snell, G.D. et al. Histocompatibility. Academic Press (1976).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Vitetta, E.S. et al. J Exp Med 144 (1976) 179.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Michaelson, J. et al. J Exp Med 145 (1977) 1066.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Schwartz, B.D. et al. J Immunol 121 (1978) 835.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Grey, M.H. et al. J Exp Med 138 (1973) 1608.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Delovitch, T.L.; Falk, J.A. Immunogenetics 8 (1979) 405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Lunney, J.K. et al. Scand J Immunol 10 (1979) 403.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Schwartz, B.D. et al. J Immunol 120 (1978) 671.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Streilein, J.W.; Duncan, W.R. Immunogenetics 9 (1979) 563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Duncan, W.R.; Streilein, J.W. This volume.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Jones, P.P. et al. J Exp Med 148 (1978) 925.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Maizels, R.M. et al. Immunogenetics 7 (1978) 425.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Cook, R.G. et al. In: Current Trends in Histocompatibility. Plenum Press (1979).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Klein, J. Adv Immunol 26 (1978) 56.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Theodore Phillips
    • 1
  • J. Wayne Streilein
    • 1
  • Diane A. Proia
    • 1
  • William R. Duncan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Cell Biology and Internal MedicineThe University of Texas Health Science Center at DallasDallasUSA

Personalised recommendations