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An Immune- and Hormone-Dependent Phase During the Latency Period of SV40 Oncogenesis in Syrian Hamsters

  • Sachi Ohtaki
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 134)

Abstract

SV40 oncogenesis in hamsters requires a latency period ranging from three to more than 12 months. Hamsters neonatally inoculated with SV40 do not develop tumors until much later, as adults, but then the incidence of tumor-bearing hamsters is very high (1). During this latency period, the hamsters appear to be immunologically neutral to SV40 or SV40-TSTA; they are neither tolerant nor resistant, and tumor induction can be prevented by specific immunization with the virus or the tumor cells up until a few weeks before the tumor becomes palpable (2,3).

Keywords

Latency Period Host Animal Graft Recipient Testosterone Propionate Cortisone Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sachi Ohtaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyNational Institute of Health, JapanMusashi-Murayama, TokyoJapan

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