Advertisement

Enhanced Intrauterine Transmission of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Immunosuppressed Hamsters

  • T. Kurata
  • K. Kurata
  • Y. Aoyama
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 134)

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during pregnancy in man may result in abortion, fetal death, perinatal infection and malformations (1–6). The source of infection in the newborns is obscure; it is unknown whether they are infected in utero transplacentally or their infection is acquired during delivery through the birth canal. There is some evidence suggesting vertical transmission of HSV infection in the mother (7–9). In animal experiments, vertical transmission of HSV infection has been demonstrated in rabbit, mouse, hamster and cat (10–14). We have documented elsewhere (15) that type 1 and 2 HSV caused placental lesions and vertical transmission of the infection in the mother into the fetus when the virus was inoculated intravenously (IV) at the middle and late stage of pregnancy.

Keywords

Dorsal Root Ganglion Herpes Simplex Virus Herpes Simplex Virus Type Viral Antigen Vertical Transmission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Florman, A.L. et al. JAMA 225 (1973) 129.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cibis, A.; Burde, R.M. Arch Ophthalmol 85 (1971) 220.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Golden, B. et al. JAMA 209 (1969) 1219.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    South, M.A. et al. J Pediatr 75 (1969) 13.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Naib, Z.M. et al. Obstet Gynecol 35 (1970) 260.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    McCallum, F.O. Proc R Soc Exp Biol Med 65 (1972) 585.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mitchell, J.E.; McColl, F.C. Am J Dis Child 106 (1963) 207.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sieber, O.F. et al. J Pediatr 69 (1966) 30.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Witzleben, C.L.; Driscoll, S.G. Pediatrics 36 (1965) 192.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Biegeleisen, J.Z., Jr.; Scott, L.V. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 95 (1958) 411.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Biegeleisen, J.Z., Jr., et al. Am J Clin Pathol 37 (1962) 289.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Hoover, E.A.; Griesemer, R.A. Am J Pathol 65 (1971) 173.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Middelkamp, J.N. et al. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 125 (1967) 757.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Munk, K.; Radsak, K. Arch Gesamte Virusforsch 25 (1968) 263.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kurata, K. et al. Jpn J Exp Med 46 (1976) 187.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Albrecht, P. et al. J Infect Dis 126 (1972) 154.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hough, V.; Robinson, T.W.E. Arch Virol 48 (1975) 75.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Weiner, L.P. et al. J Immunol 106 (1971) 427.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Aoyama, Y. et al. In: Fluorescent Antibody Techniques and their Applications, ed. Kawamura. University Park Press (1977) 144.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Strawn, E.Y.; Scrimenti, R.J. Am J Obstet Gynecol 115 (1973) 581.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Goldman, R.L. Obstet Gynecol 36 (1970) 603.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Hondo, R. Jpn J Med Sci Biol 27 (1974) 205.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Lagrange, P.H. et al. J Exp Med 139 (1973) 1529.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Hoffsten, P.E.; Dixon, F.J. J Immunol 112 (1974) 564.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Kurata
    • 1
  • K. Kurata
    • 1
  • Y. Aoyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Medical ScienceUniversity of TokyoMinato-ku, Tokyo 108Japan

Personalised recommendations