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Engagement-Disengagement and Early Object Experiences

  • Beatrice Beebe
  • Daniel N. Stern
Part of the The Downstate Series of Research in Psychiatry and Psychology book series (DSRPP, volume 1)

Abstract

The last decade’s research has revolutionized our view of the capacities of the human infant in the early months, forcing a recognition of his considerable receptivity to environmental stimulation and his own capacity to seek stimulation and initiate social interactions. Particularly significant has been an appreciation of the central role of the infant’s capacity for vis-a-vis orientation and sustained visual regard, which are considered to be among the most fundamental paradigms of communication, and central to the developing attachment between mother and infant (Walters & Parke, 1965; Robson, 1967).

Keywords

Facial Expression Head Orientation Object Experience Visual Check Animate Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beatrice Beebe
    • 1
  • Daniel N. Stern
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryCornell University Medical Center-New York HospitalNew YorkUSA

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