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Body Movement, Ideation, and Verbalization During Psychoanalysis

  • George F. Mahl
Part of the The Downstate Series of Research in Psychiatry and Psychology book series (DSRPP, volume 1)

Abstract

I will focus on one role of actions in the process of verbalization in psychoanalysis. The kind of actions I will discuss is familiar to every analyst, who usually regards them as expressions of the repressed. In his case reports, and technique papers, Freud cited such actions and saw them in that light. (Freud, 1893–95, 1905, 1909a, 1909b, 1913, 1914, 1918). To mention but one example, he noticed that Dora repeatedly opened her handbag and put her finger in it during one of her analytic hours. Only a few days earlier, she had claimed she had no memories of masturbating in childhood. Freud concluded that Dora betrayed her secret in these actions (Freud, 1905).

Keywords

Body Movement Anal Intercourse Sensory Feedback Primitive Ideation Verbal Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • George F. Mahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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