Advertisement

Design of a Cryogenic Expansion Engine for Tonnage Hydrogen Liquefaction

  • W. A. Morain
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 12)

Abstract

The reciprocating expansion engine as used in air separation and liquefaction has been in service for many years. The design and performance of the conventional and most common type, with a lubricated cylinder encased in a water warming jacket, is well known to the cryogenic industry. However, the more recent developments with un-lubricated cylinders designed to operate at inlet pressures from 1500–3000 psi and piston speeds from 500–700 fpm have not been discussed in much detail. Engines of this type have brought about reductions in plant cost and complexity, at the same time improving plant safety and efficiency. Furthermore, they have paved the way for the large cryogenic units, capable of operation at the extreme conditions required for the tonnage liquefaction of hydrogen and helium.

Keywords

Cylinder Head Piston Ring Radiation Shield Heat Leak Piston Speed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    S. L. Collins and R. L. Cannaday, Expansion Engines for Low Temperature Processes, Oxford University Press, London (1958).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. L. Land, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 2, Plenum Press, New York (1959), p. 250.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. L. Land, “Technical Aspects of Liquid Hydrogen Production Expansion Engine Performance,” 50th National A.I.Ch.E. Meeting paper, Buffalo, N.Y. (May 1963).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    W. A. Morain and J. S. Holmes, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 8, Plenum Press, New York (1962), p. 228.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. A. Morain, “Reciprocating Expansion Engines with Unlubricated Cylinders,” in: Safety in Air and Ammonia Plants, Vol. 6, Transcript of San Juan Symposium from 51st National A.I.Ch.E. Meeting (September 29-October 2, 1963), p. 27.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    W. J. Arnold and W. J. Eser, Jr., “Materials and Designs for Non Lube Applications,” Oil and Gas Div., A.S.M.E. Conference, Dallas, Texas (April 1964).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    P. Hanlon, “Non Lubricated Packings and Piston Rings,” Oil and Gas Div., A.S.M.E. Conference, Dallas, Texas (April 1964).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Morain
    • 1
  1. 1.Cooper-Bessemer Div.Cooper IndustriesMt. VernonUSA

Personalised recommendations