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A Review of Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Behavior

  • F. R. Schwartzberg
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 12)

Abstract

Fracture toughness data have been obtained for a variety of engineering materials down to — 423°F. These data recently have been reviewed and compiled. This paper represents a summary and discussion of these data as well as the problems associated with valid testing.

Keywords

Fracture Toughness Slow Crack Growth Plane Strain Fracture Toughness Fracture Toughness Data Toughness Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. R. Schwartzberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Martin-Marietta CorporationDenverUSA

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