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Correlation of the Maximum Heat Flux and Temperature Difference in the Nucleate Boiling of Corresponding States Liquids

  • C. B. Cobb
  • E. L. ParkJr.
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 12)

Abstract

Technologically, the most important point on the boiling curve is the maximum point in the nucleate boiling region (the burnout point). In the nucleate boiling region, heat transfer coefficients of several thousand Btu/hr-ft2 are not uncommon; however, upon entry into the film boiling region the heat transfer coefficient may drop by a factor of one hundred or more. In addition to the undesirable heat transfer which is common to the film boiling region, the heat transfer surface can be melted because of the high resistance to heat transfer away from the heat transfer surface. Because of these factors, a reliable equation which can be used to predict the heat flux at the burnout point is of primary interest to investigators studying boiling heat transfer. At present, there is no general equation which will predict the heat flux at the burnout point. One of the probable reasons that the correlation of the critical heat flux has not yielded to analysis is that there is no method, as yet, of measuring all the variables which affect the burnout point. In fact, at present, the exact effect of several variables which may be important is not understood. Therefore, a method of eliminating these variables which are not understood is needed in order to compare data obtained under different conditions.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Heat Flux Heat Transfer Coefficient Critical Heat Flux Boiling Heat Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. B. Cobb
    • 1
  • E. L. ParkJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Missouri at RollaRollaUSA

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