Advertisement

Design and Development of a Test Facility for the Disposal of Hydrogen at High Flow Rates

  • W. R. Thompson
  • C. S. Boncore
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 12)

Abstract

Rocket nozzles developed for nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site under the NERVA and Phoebus programs are first performance-evaluated in chemical simulation firings. In these tests, the nozzle is coupled to a modified liquid rocket injector by an adapter section which serves as a combustion chamber for liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen combustion. Normally, in liquid rocket systems, the hydrogen so injected is first utilized to cool the nozzle regeneratively. In the case of the nuclear nozzles under development, however, the total coolant flow exceeds that required for simulation combustion; thus, an appreciable quantity of the coolant must be disposed of in a separate facility. Chemical testing of the Phoebus-2 nozzle requires disposing of up to 250 lb/sec of nozzle coolant hydrogen in a safe and controlled manner. Combustion with atmospheric oxygen is the only feasible method to dispose of gas vented at these high flow rates over about a 17–20-sec period.

Keywords

High Flow Rate Test Stand Flame Height Distribution Header Pond Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. B. Banks and D. V. Chandrasekhara, J. Fluid Mech. 15:13 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. A. Putnam and C. F. Speich, “A Model Study of the Interacting Effects of Mass Fires,’’ Summary Report to NBS, Battelle Memorial Institute (November 9, 1961).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. A. Putnam and C. F. Speich, “A Model Study of the Interaction Effects of Mass Fires,’’ Summary Report No. 2 to NBS, Battelle Memorial Institute (March 27, 1963).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. A. Putnam and C. F. Speich, in: Ninth Symposium (International) on Combustion, Academic Press, New York (1963), p. 867.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    I. M. Grinberg and A. A. Putnam, “A Model Study of the Interaction Effects of Mass Fires,” Summary Report No. 3 to NBS, Battelle Memorial Institute (September 28, 1964).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. R. Thompson
    • 1
  • C. S. Boncore
    • 1
  1. 1.Aerojet-General CorporationSacramentoUSA

Personalised recommendations