Advertisement

An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of the Thermal Behavior of Liquid Hydrogen in a Tank Designed and Insulated for Use in a Hypersonic Vehicle

  • G. B. Yates
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 12)

Abstract

Attention has been focused in recent years on hypersonic flight. Numerous synthesis and systems studies have been conducted to define and optimize various airframe and propulsion concepts. Liquid hydrogen almost always evolves as the most desirable fuel because of its two inherent advantages, i.e., high heat capacity which provides needed coolant and high energy content per unit mass.

Keywords

Heat Flux Liquid Level Liquid Hydrogen Test Tank Hypersonic Vehicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    C.K. Perkins and R. D. Wilburn, “Capacitance Mass Sensing of Boiling Propellants,” SAE/ ASME Air Transport and Space Meeting, Paper No. 859A, New York (April 1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. W. Tatom, W. H. Brown, L. H. Knight, and E. F. Coxe, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 9, Plenum Press, New York (1964), p. 265.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    T. H. K. Frederking, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 9, Plenum Press, New York (1964), p. 71.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. W. Graham, R. C. Hendricks, and R. C. Ehlers, in: International Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Plenum Press, New York (1965), p. 342Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. K. Morgan and H. F. Brady, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 7, Plenum Press, New York (1962), p. 206.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. B. Yates
    • 1
  1. 1.General Dynamics/ConvairSan DiegoUSA

Personalised recommendations