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Abstract

In recent years, much attention has been paid to the study of the nature and characteristics of the propagation of direct waves in real media [1–4]. This is because the form of the seismic pulse is required in the solution of a number of practical problems. Among these problems are those of controlling the shooting conditions, of determining the properties of the medium (the frequency dependence of the attenuation and reflection factors, and so on), of obtaining source data for constructing synthetic seismograms, and so on.

Keywords

Direct Wave Secondary Emission Shot Point Bubble Pulse Ondary Pulse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau, New York 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. V. Kuznetsov
  • Yu. A. Ostrovskii

There are no affiliations available

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