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The Use of a Genetically Incompatible Combination of Host and Virus (MHV) for the Study of Mechanisms of Host Resistance

  • Frederik B. Bang
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 142)

Abstract

In 1960 when we found that mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) could grow in, and would destroy, macrophages in tissue culture, and that macrophage behavior in vitro reflected the single gene for susceptibility in the mouse,1,2 we constructed a simple model of how genetic resistance and susceptibility to this virus functioned. Today, the basic experimental findings remain unchanged, but new findings have compelled a very different interpretation of the same data. We believe that this re-interpretation applies to many host-virus genetic systems. It may be useful to first follow each item that has been re-interpreted, and then illustrate how the more complex model can clarify one way in which the environment affects host-parasite interrelations. We believe that the effects of environmental pollutants could be tested in this system. The original view of the system and the change in viewpoint between 1960 and 1980 are shown in Table 1.

Keywords

Resistant Cell Host Resistance Congenic Strain Genetic Resistance Susceptible Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederik B. Bang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathobiologyThe Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public HealthBaltimoreUSA

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