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On Enteropathogenic Bovine Coronavirus

  • J. Storz
  • G. Kaluza
  • H. Niemann
  • R. Rott
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 142)

Abstract

Cornonaviruses cause severe and economically important intestinal infections in newborn calves which become manifest as enteritis with diarrhea and additional clinical consequences. Studies concerning the pathogenesis of enteropathogenic bovine coronavirus (EBC-virus) enteritis have led to a better understanding of morphological alterations of the intestinal tract as well as of the individual cells, helping to explain the functional disorders observed with this disease (for references see Storz and Rott, 1980). Relatively little is known, however, about structural details of the virus and about the biochemical events of EBC-virus replication, principally a result of the difficulties encountered in growing the virus in tissue culture. After we succeeded in adapting EBC-virus strain L-9 isolated by Mebus et al. (1973) to grow in bovine fetal thyroid or brain cells in reasonable amounts it became possible to study some of the many unanswered questions. As a beginning, efforts were made to determine optimal growth conditions in order to provide an in vitro source for viral antigen. In addition, biochemical analysis of the virus was undertaken.

Keywords

Infected Cell Culture Feline Infectious Peritonitis Bovine Seron Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Serum Neutralization Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Klenk, H.-D., and Rott, R. Cotranslational and posttranslational processing of viral glycoproteins. Current Topics Microbiol. Immunol. 90, 19–48.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Storz
    • 2
  • G. Kaluza
    • 1
  • H. Niemann
    • 1
  • R. Rott
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für VirologieJustus-Liebig-Universität GiessenGiessenGermany
  2. 2.The Department of Microbiology College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical SciencesColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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