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Rule-Following

  • Steven C. Hayes
  • Robert D. Zettle
  • Irwin Rosenfarb

Abstract

This chapter takes as its starting point the analysis of verbal stimulation and rule-understanding presented in the previous chapter. We consider two topics. First, given that one understands a rule, why might one follow it? Second, how might rule-following interact with other psychological processes in a behavioral episode?

Keywords

Verbal Stimulus Behavior Analyst Therapeutic Change Verbal Event Instructional Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven C. Hayes
    • 1
  • Robert D. Zettle
    • 2
  • Irwin Rosenfarb
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Nevada-RenoRenoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyWichita State UniversityWichitaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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