From Spontaneous Event to Lucidity

A Review of Attempts to Consciously Control Nocturnal Dreaming
  • Charles T. Tart

Abstract

Within Western culture, dreams have been and are still generally regarded as events that just happen to people, bizarre nocturnal events that seldom bear any discernible relation to the waking life of the dreamer. If dreams are given any positive value, they are seen as unsolicited gifts. When not particularly valued, the more usual situation in our culture, they are seen as mostly meaningless, chance events. The occasional relationships between life events and dreams tend to be fitted into what Hadfield (1954) charmingly called the “pickled walnut theories” of dreaming: If you ate something that disagreed with you, it might result in the bizarre mental activity of dreaming.

Keywords

Dust Hull Peri Fishing Arena 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles T. Tart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California at DavisDavisUSA

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