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Controlled Release and Plant-Growth Regulators

  • Jocelyn M. Miller
  • Amar Yahiaoui

Abstract

Efficient delivery of agricultural chemicals to crops has been the major focus of controlled release research. The resulting commercial applications have centered on traditional fertilizers, herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides. However, recent research suggests that significantly greater productivity can be achieved by using controlled release methods to deliver plant-growth regulators.

Traditional agricultural chemicals promote increased plant productivity by control of: disease, pest attack, weed competition, and soil components. Plant-growth regulators are substances which promote growth by modification of the plant characteristics. The mechanisms are not well understood and the technology has been hindered by lack of a suitable delivery system. Plant-growth regulators have to be applied in minute quantities and in a time-tailored manner. Those delivery system requirements are unique characteristics of controlled release systems.

Plant-growth regulators are generally classified by their dominant growth effect: cell elongation, cell division, dormancy induction, abscission, ripening acceleration, fruit and flower initiation, and bulb production. However, excess concentration or improperly timed application can produce undesired effects. For this reason, plant-growth regulators have received rather limited commercial application. They currently represent less than 1% of agricultural chemical sales.

Several research projects have proven the feasibility of delivering plant-growth regulators using controlled release systems. The next major step will be to perfect the technique for application to a commercial crop. Successful development will help solve the world food-supply problem.

Keywords

Active Agent Control Release Maleic Hydrazide Maleic Hydrazide Plant Growth Substance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jocelyn M. Miller
    • 1
  • Amar Yahiaoui
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Forest ResourcesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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