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Energy Transfer by the Heart

  • M. I. M. Noble
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 62)

Abstract

Energy in the form of substrates and oxygen is extracted from the blood by the heart and transferred to energy in the form of energy rich phospate compounds (ATP and creatine phosphate). This energy is utilized for cell homeostasis, the generation of electrical potential and movement of activator calcium. These permit the transfer of energy to mechanical ouput and heat. The mechanical energy is transferred to blood movement through the peripheral circulation where it also is finally dissipated as heat.

Keywords

Coronary Flow Coronary Blood Flow Creatine Phosphate Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Coronary Vascular Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. I. M. Noble
    • 1
  1. 1.The Midhurst Medical Research InstituteMidhurst, West SussexEngland

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