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6-Mercaptopurine: Pharmacokinetics in Animals and Preliminary Results in Children

  • T. J. Schouten
  • R. A. De Abreu
  • C. H. M. M. De Bruyn
  • E. Van Der Kleijn
  • M. J. M. Oosterbaan
  • E. D. A. M. Schretlen
  • G. A. M. De Vaan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 165)

Abstract

For three decades 6-mercaptopurine (6MP), an analog of hypoxan-thine, has been used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Only in recent years sensitive and specific methods for the determination of 6MP and closely related drugs like 6-thioguanine (6TG) and azathioprine (AZA) have become available. The study of the pharmacokinetics of these drugs is possible now in animals and man, employing dose levels which are common in clinical practice.

Keywords

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Maintenance Treatment Purine Nucleotide Prolonged Infusion Cytotoxic Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. Schouten
    • 1
  • R. A. De Abreu
    • 1
  • C. H. M. M. De Bruyn
    • 2
  • E. Van Der Kleijn
    • 3
  • M. J. M. Oosterbaan
    • 3
  • E. D. A. M. Schretlen
    • 1
  • G. A. M. De Vaan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics (Div. Ped. Oncology)St. Radboud Hospital Catholic UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Departments of Human GeneticsSt. Radboud Hospital Catholic UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Departments of Clinical PharmacySt. Radboud Hospital Catholic UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands

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