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Changes in Purine Salvage Pathway Enzyme Activities During Human Lymphocyte Differentiation Induced by Thymosin Fraction 5

  • Morton J. Cowan
  • Mark Fraga
  • Arthur J. Ammann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 165)

Abstract

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside Phosphorylase(PNP), two purine salvage pathway enzymes, are essential to normal immune function. These two sequential enzymes have separate roles in the functioning of the immune system since deficiencies of each result in distinct clinical and laboratory immunodeficient states (Giblett et al., 1972; Giblett et al., 1975). Also, these two enzymes have been studied in different malignant cell lines as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations (PBMC) from individuals with different types of lymphoid malignancies(Tritsch and Minowada, 1978; Blatt et al., 1980). Results from these studies have suggested that ADA and PNP may serve as markers for cell differentiation.

Keywords

Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Adenosine Deaminase Lymphoid Malignancy Null Cell Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morton J. Cowan
    • 1
  • Mark Fraga
    • 1
  • Arthur J. Ammann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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