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Ecological Efficiency and Activity Metabolism

  • Gary D. Sharp
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 13)

Abstract

Quite simply stated the total productivity of an ecosystem is the sum of the productivities of the components. However, this in no obvious way simplifies the aggregation of trophic levels, for simplicity’s sake, in order that only some few measurements or estimates might be made and their products summed to yield a general solution of the productivity of a given system. The problems lie in the differences in the efficiencies of the various inter and intra-trophic level components, their distributions in time and space, the typical number of interactions they participate in within the food web, and the life history pathways followed. My comments will be primarily directed at an evaluation of efficiencies of various trophic groups, which will, by their nature, require a series of comparisons and contrasts of distributions, behaviors, and life histories.

Keywords

Larval Fish Eastern Pacific Ocean Ecological Efficiency Larval Anchovy Somatic Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary D. Sharp
    • 1
  1. 1.Fisheries Resources OfficerFood and Agricultural Organization of the United NationsRomeItaly

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