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Disturbances in Water Balance Controls Following Lesions to the Area Postrema and Adjacent Solitary Nucleus

  • Richard R. Miselis
  • Thomas M. Hyde
  • Robert E. Shapiro
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 105)

Abstract

Lesions which remove the area postrema (AP) and the subjacent portions of the nucleus of the solitary tract (cmNTS) which lie in the caudal brainstem close to the dorsal spinomedullary junction cause dramatic and apparently permanent alterations in energy and fluid balance1,2. There is a well characterized syndrome of transient hypophagia and accompanying weight loss. Two to three weeks into this syndrome normophagia resumes with eventual stabilization of body weight but at a lower level. In addition there is a mild hyperdipsia. See figure 1.

Keywords

Urine Osmolality Area Postrema Solitary Tract Hypoglossal Nucleus Dorsal Motor Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard R. Miselis
    • 1
  • Thomas M. Hyde
    • 1
  • Robert E. Shapiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Biology, Institute of Neurological Sciences School of Veterinary Medicine and School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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