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Central Metabolism of Angiotensins: Potential Functional Significance

  • J. W. Harding
  • R. H. Abhold
  • C. G. Camara
  • J. B. Erickson
  • E. P. Petersen
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 105)

Abstract

Many species2/7 have both pressor and dipsogenic responses to intracerebroventricularly (ICV) applied angiotensin II (AII) and III (AIII). Implicit in this central nervous system (CNS) responsiveness to AII and AIII is the existence of specific membrane-bound receptors. Furthermore these receptors would be expected to be present in those areas of the CNS which are known to be angiotensin sensitive, namely the circumventricular organs4. Surprisingly, this logical inference with regard to the distribution of receptors as determined by radioligand binding methods has not been consistently validated when 125I-AII is used as the labeled ligand in the presence of chelating agents1/3/6. However, when 125I-AIII is used as the radioligand, “apparent” binding is seen in many brain regions in every species examined. The term “apparent” is used because high performance liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of bound label derived from 125I-AIII incubated membranes clearly indicated that degradation products, especially 125I-tyrosine (Tyr), make up the large majority of bound label. This finding, may, in fact, indicate that “apparent” AIII binding is artifactual in the sense that it has nothing to do with angiotensin binding sites but may represent nonspecific degradation of angiotensins and subsequent uptake of labeled products. On the other hand, this degradation and tyrosine transloction may be a concerted event that accompanies angiotensin binding, suggesting that specific peptidases may be a part of the receptor complex. This study which examines these possibilities strongly supports this notion.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatographic High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis Brain Membrane Synaptosomal Membrane Circumventricular Organ 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Harding
    • 1
  • R. H. Abhold
    • 1
  • C. G. Camara
    • 1
  • J. B. Erickson
    • 1
  • E. P. Petersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of VCAPPWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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