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A Single Experience with Hyperoncotic Colloid Dialysis Persistently Alters Water and Sodium Intake

  • Sandra P. Frankmann
  • Daniel M. Dorsa
  • Randall R. Sakai
  • John B. Simpson
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 105)

Abstract

Subcutaneous administration of high molecular weight colloids, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), in hyperoncotic concentrations produces acute increases in water and saline intake, and is used extensively as a model system for hypovolemic thirst (1). Homeostasis in this state is defended both by renal conservation of water and sodium and by the ingestion of water and sodium. In the course of analyzing this effect, we noted that rats receiving an injection of PEG showed a persistently elevated preference for 0.3 M NaCl. Similar persistent increases of saline intake have been noted by other investigators (2,3,4). The experiments described here were designed to investigate several possible mechanisms underlying the prolonged increase in saline intake which followed a single experience with PEG.

Keywords

Sodium Intake Dietary Sodium Restriction Sodium Appetite Daily Fluid Intake Purina Chow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E. M. Stricker, Thirst and sodium appetite after colloid treatment in rats, J. Comp. Physiol. Psych. 95: 1 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    R. W. Bryant, A. N. Epstein, J. T. Fitzsimons and S. J. Fluharty, Arousal of a specific and persistent sodium appetite in the rat with continuous intracerebro-ventricular infusion of angiotensin II, J. Physiol. (London). 301: 365 (1980).Google Scholar
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    J. L. Falk and J. M. Lipton, Temporal factors in the genesis of NaCl appetite by intraperitoneal dialysis, J. Comp. and Physiol. Psychol. 63: 247 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    A.L.R. Findlay and A. N. Epstein, Increased sodium intake is somehow induced in rats by intravenous angiotensin II, Hormones Behav. 14: 86 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J. W. Wright and E. M. Schulz, Influence of repeated deprivation upon starvation-induced hypovolemia and plasma aldosterone concentration in rats, Pharmacol. Behav. 16: 697 (1982).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra P. Frankmann
    • 1
  • Daniel M. Dorsa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Randall R. Sakai
    • 1
  • John B. Simpson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.GRECC, VA Medical Center and Department of PharmacologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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