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Myelination Capacity of Transplanted Oligodendrocytes

  • M. Gumpel
  • F. Lachapelle
  • C. Lubetzki
  • A. Gansmüller
  • A. Baron-Van Evercooren
  • P. Lombrail
  • O. Gout
  • M. Baulac
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 142)

Abstract

The first steps of oligodendrocytes differentiation have been first studied by morphologists (reviewed by Privat 1975). Originated from the germinative epithelium, these cells progressively differentiate in the periventricular zone before they start to myelinate. Among morphological traits specific of oligodendrocytes, the electron density of their cytoplasm increases with maturation. On this criterium, three stages were distinguished by Mori and Leblond (1970): “light”, “medium” and “dark” cells. More recent immuno-histochemical studies by Raff et al. (1983) allowed to recognize in vitro 3 types of macroglial cells: type I and type II astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Type II astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were shown to differentiate from one single precursor cell (02A) characterized by the presence of A2B5 antigen which disappears during differentiation. Raff et al.(1985) demonstrated that, in vitro, the presence of type I astrocytes could modify the timing of differentiation of 02A precursor cells into oligodendrocytes. To our knowledge, this work is the only experimental attempt to study the role of extrinsic factors on the timing of differentiation of oligodendrocytes.

Keywords

Myelin Basic Protein Mature Oligodendrocyte Oligodendrocyte Differentiation Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Neuron Host Brain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Gumpel
    • 1
  • F. Lachapelle
    • 1
  • C. Lubetzki
    • 1
  • A. Gansmüller
    • 1
  • A. Baron-Van Evercooren
    • 1
  • P. Lombrail
    • 2
  • O. Gout
    • 1
  • M. Baulac
    • 3
  1. 1.I.N.S.E.R.M. U 134 Hopital de la SalpetrièreGermany
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Neuropathologie R. EscourolleHopital de la SalpetrièreGermany
  3. 3.Clinique des maladies du système nerveuxHopital de la SalpetrièreGermany

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