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Autism: Social Communication Difficulties and Related Behaviors

  • Lynn Kern Koegel
  • Marta C. Valdez-Menchaca
  • Robert L. Koegel

Abstract

There has been considerable progress and development in the diagnosis and treatment of autism over the past several decades. This chapter provides an account of the major findings that have led to our increased understanding of the behavioral manifestations of autism and the development of intervention techniques. Evidence on the etiology and treatment will be reviewed within a framework that explores the possibility that neurological or physiological processes may result in an inappropriate level of social interaction, which in turn leads to disorders in communication and other maladaptive and disruptive behaviors that characterize autism. Understanding this atypical developmental track leads directly to the understanding, treatment, and prevention of many of the severe aspects of autism that are so stigmatizing and disabling to children, adolescents, and adults.

Keywords

Disruptive Behavior Developmental Disorder Challenging Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Communicative Intent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn Kern Koegel
    • 1
  • Marta C. Valdez-Menchaca
    • 1
  • Robert L. Koegel
    • 1
  1. 1.Autism Research Center, Graduate School of EducationUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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