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Psychoanalytic Model

  • Howard D. Lerner
  • Joshua Ehrlich

Abstract

Sigmund Freud, through his discoveries about the inner workings of the mind, offered people a revolutionary way in which to view themselves. His discoveries suggested that mental life was vastly more complex than psychologists and philosophers had previously believed. As an important example, psychologists before Freud believed that mental functioning was conscious. Freud’s revolutionary method of studying the mind, which he called psychoanalysis, indicated that what is mental includes far more than what is merely conscious or accessible to consciousness. His illumination of unconscious thought processes dramatically expanded the depth, range, and scope of psychology and altered our understanding of human nature. The enduring impact of the founder of psychoanalysis upon the field is truly striking. Though psychoanalytic thought and method have evolved enormously since Freud, 50 years after his death Freud and psychoanalysis are still considered synonymous in people’s minds.

Keywords

Object Representation Object Relation Depressive Affect Borderline Patient Severe Psychopathology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard D. Lerner
    • 1
  • Joshua Ehrlich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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