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Schizophrenia

  • Patrick W. McGuffin
  • Randall L. Morrison

Abstract

Schizophrenia is an extremely disabling disorder, which presents with a wide range of disruptive symptoms and leads to a significant loss in ability to function independently. Its prognosis is generally poor and its course tends toward progressively more disabled functioning over time. Schizophrenia has been observed for more than 3000 years. In the time that the disorder was recognized, it had been attributed to various causes, including satanic possession. More recently, empirically based theories regarding schizophrenia began to develop.

Keywords

Negative Symptom Psychotic Symptom Family Therapy Antipsychotic Medication Tardive Dyskinesia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick W. McGuffin
    • 1
  • Randall L. Morrison
    • 2
  1. 1.Hahnemann UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Response Analysis CorporationPrincetonUSA

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