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Conduct Disorder

  • Marc S. Atkins
  • Kim Brown

Abstract

There are many types of conduct problems in children and, as will be noted in this chapter, many factors that impact on the course and outcome of childhood conduct problems. Aggressive behavior, perhaps the most visible of childhood conduct problems, is, in itself, only moderately associated with later antisocial behavior. However, in combination with other behaviors, such as hyperactivity, lying and stealing, and poor peer relations, childhood aggression is clearly and strongly associated with problems in adolescence and adulthood. In fact, this is the case with all factors that contribute to the onset and maintenance of conduct problems. Specifically, this chapter will describe efforts to consider conduct problems in the context of home, school, and peer activities and relationships, and the complex interactions that result.

Keywords

Conduct Problem Antisocial Behavior Maternal Depression Conduct Disorder Childhood Conduct Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc S. Atkins
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kim Brown
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Children’s Seashore HousePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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