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Deficient and Sufficient Immune Systems in the Nude Mouse

  • Berenice Kindred

Abstract

Nude was described as another hairless mutant by Flanagan in 1966, but it was not until Pantelouris (1968) observed that these mice also lacked a thymus that they began to be used widely in different fields of research. Early work using nude mice for studying T-cell differentiation and the role of T cells in antibody- and cell-mediated responses was soon overwhelmed by oncologic studies when it was established that many human tumors could be grown in nude mice and that the tumors showed only minor changes in their growth patterns and morphology. Today the use of nude mice in the fields of infectious disease and parasitology is steadily increasing and it remains to be seen how extensive their eventual contribution to biomedical research will be.

Keywords

Nude Mouse Spleen Cell Athymic Nude Mouse Athymic Mouse Secondary Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Berenice Kindred
    • 1
  1. 1.German Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergWest Germany

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