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Vascular Dopamine and Dopamine Receptor Agonists

  • Barry A. Berkowitz
  • Robert Erickson
  • Bodgan Zabko-Potavpovich
  • Eliot H. Ohlstein
Part of the New Horizons in Therapeutics book series (NHTH)

Abstract

Regulation and modulation of the sympathetic nervous system have been and remain cornerstone strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Whereas stimulating, mimicking or antagonizing norepinephrine and epinphrine have been the most frequently utilized approach to cardiovascular renal therapeutics, the possibility that dopamine and dopamine receptors serve as useful target sites for drug action has received less attention.

Keywords

Dopamine Receptor Adenylate Cyclase Dopamine Receptor Agonist Fusaric Acid Vascular Relaxation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry A. Berkowitz
    • 1
  • Robert Erickson
    • 1
  • Bodgan Zabko-Potavpovich
    • 1
  • Eliot H. Ohlstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Smith Kline & French LaboratoriesPhiladelphiaUSA

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