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Basic Principles of Thermochemical Conversion

  • Stephen M. Kohan

Abstract

This chapter addresses some of the basic principles of the thermochemical conversion of biomass to other, more useful products. Thermochemical conversion usually denotes such concepts as combustion (discussed in Chapter 6), gasification, pyrolysis, and liquefaction, all of which involve the high-temperature (and occasionally high-pressure) processing of biomass.

Keywords

Corn Stover Biomass Feedstock Electric Power Research Institute Biomass Gasification Thermochemical Conversion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen M. Kohan
    • 1
  1. 1.Electric Power Research InstitutePalo AltoUSA

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