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Technical Considerations of Biomass Conversion Processes

  • John M. Radovich

Abstract

Material balances are a restatement of the law of conservation of mass, “mass is neither created nor destroyed,” as applied to processes involving chemical and physical changes. A material balance is a balance on mass not on volume nor on moles. It is an accounting of all the material entering and leaving a system. The balance is made with respect to clearly defined, but often arbitrarily chosen, system boundaries. The boundaries of the system must be stated precisely in order for the balance to be useful. The material balance becomes essential in process evaluations because it permits the engineer to (1) determine the flow rates or amounts of unknown streams, (2) recognize incomplete or incorrect data and subsequently obtain usable data from additional measurements or accurate estimates, and (3) design equipment for the process.

Keywords

Enthalpy Change Conversion Process System Boundary Material Balance Fuel Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Radovich
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Chemical Engineering and Materials ScienceUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA

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