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Alpha-Adrenergic Receptors in Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy

  • Tsutomu Azuma
  • Tomokazu Suzuki
  • Saburo Sakoda
  • Ryuzo Mizuno
  • Seiichi Tsujino
  • Susumu Kishimoto
  • Shu-ichi Ikeda
  • Nobuo Yanagisawa
  • Akira Nakajima
Chapter

Abstract

Type 1 familial amyloidotic polyneuropothy (FAP) is a rare hereditary amyloidosis with special involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Autonomic nerve involvement is a striking feature of this type. Constipation, explosive diarrhea, sexual impotence, sphincter impairment, hypohidrosis, orthostatic hypotension, and disordered cardiac conduction are commonly observed. Autonomic involvement is often responsible for death. In earlier studies, we found that patients with advanced FAP had decreased urinary excretion rates of norepinephrine (NE) (Suzuki et al., 1979) and decreased plasma NE concentration (Suzuki et al., 1981), and that the responsiveness of their blood pressure to infused NE was exaggerated (Suzuki et al,. 1980a). These findings suggested that in advanced FAP patients noradrenergic receptors are more sensitive to agonists because NE in the sympathetic nerves is chronically depleted. We now report the findings of α2-adrenergic receptor binding in platelet membranes, and of α1-adrenergic receptor binding in aortic membranes from the FAP patients.

Keywords

Orthostatic Hypotension Adrenergic Receptor Platelet Membrane Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsutomu Azuma
    • 1
  • Tomokazu Suzuki
    • 1
  • Saburo Sakoda
    • 1
  • Ryuzo Mizuno
    • 1
  • Seiichi Tsujino
    • 1
  • Susumu Kishimoto
    • 1
  • Shu-ichi Ikeda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nobuo Yanagisawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Akira Nakajima
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.The Nakajima Medical ClinicAraoJapan
  2. 2.The Third Department of Internal MedicineOsaka University HospitalOsakaJapan
  3. 3.The Third Department of MedicineShinshu University School of MedicineMatsumotoJapan

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